The next season

Would you believe me if I said this fish was hooked, but got off, then came back to eat again?  Well it did, and there's 3 witnesses.  PHOTO: CAPT. LUKE KAVAJECZ

Would you believe me if I said this fish was hooked, but got off, then came back to eat again?  Well it did, and there's 3 witnesses.  PHOTO: CAPT. LUKE KAVAJECZ

There's really two shallow seasons around here.  The first season is the spring/summer smallmouth fishery.  Once September rolls around, those big lake bass tend to roll into deeper water and although the fishing can be fantastic, it's not that classic shallow water fishing we all enjoy and after 4 straight months of smallmouth, one tends to look forward to fishing for something else.  The next shallow season is right around the corner.  We'll be moving outside the bay and running bigger water to chase big trout on shallow shorelines.  It's a fishing experience that makes me more and more excited each and every time we head out there.  It's the kind of fishing you can tell somebody about, but until you get out there and see it, only then does it make sense.  It's not easy, but it's not too hard either.  If you like the idea of heading out with the hopes to hook a big fish in an extremely unique setting, this is for you.  It takes the right mind-set, but it's hard to get frustrated when there's so much to look at out there.  The water can seem empty for most of the day, especially when in a spot where you can see all the rocks, sand and pebbles on the bottom and swear there's no fish anywhere only to be surprised when a big, dark shadow rockets out from behind a boulder and inhales your offering.  Then it's game on and you had better hope you stuck that fish good, because who knows how many more chances you'll get.